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"Each of us must come to care about everyone else's children. We must recognize that the well being of our own children is intimately linked to the well being of all other people's children. After all, when one of our children needs life-saving surgery, someone else's child will perform it. When one of our children is harmed by violence, someone else's child will commit it. The good life for our own children can be secured only if it is also secured for all other people's children. But to work for the well being of all children is not just a practical matter-- it is also right!" - Lilian G. Katz, Phd.

Monday, January 31, 2005

Who Are You?

Who Are You?
More Inspiration Solutions

Adapted from Present Moment Awareness, by Shannon Duncan (New World Library, 2003).

What do you identify yourself with? You might be surprised when you really start looking closely. The following questions will really get you thinking deeply about how you define yourself. Answering them requires sincere intent, self-honesty, and a good sense of humor!


Simple Solution:


Questions to ponder, here:

Are you your occupation? “I am a consultant, unemployed, a doctor, a lawyer, a cook, a soldier, an administrative assistant, a teacher a scientist, an accountant.”

Are you your hobbies? “I am a painter, a rock climber, a jogger, a gardener.”

Are you your body? “I am fat, skinny, tall, short, beautiful, ugly.”

Are you your emotions? “I am angry, sad, happy, disgusted, bored.”

Are you your thoughts?

Are you your causes? “I am pro-life, pro-choice, a Democrat, a Republican, a libertarian, a neo-Nazi, an equal rights activist.”

Are you your ethnicity? “I am African-American, Caucasian, Asian.”

Are you a parent? “I am a father, a mother, a good parent, a bad parent.”

Are you what you have? “I drive a Porsche, a BMW, a Chevy, a hybrid.” “I am rich, poor, moderately well off.”

Are you your “good” qualities? “I am helpful, compassionate, intelligent, honest, generous.”

Are you your “bad” qualities? “I am selfish, arrogant, insecure, jealous, mean.”

Are you your achievements? “I am a war hero, an employee of the year, a self-made multimillionaire.”

Are you your failure? “I am bankrupt, a high-school dropout, an abusive parent.”

These things have become a false self when we get our sense of identity and self-worth from them. At that point, they are no longer things we do, have, think, or feel, but rather the basis for how we value ourselves.

Do you think that if any of these things were to change that who you are would change too? Would your value as a human being change as well?